June 6, 2020

How to keep safe ourselves during COVID-19

Over 6 million people have been infected with coronavirus. Of these, close to 400 000 have died from it (1). At first, the virus brought life to a standstill. Now, it is reshaping the way we live our everyday lives. Lockdowns, social distancing and isolation are realities now. Life, as we knew it just 3 months ago, is history until a vaccine is found.

In recent weeks, for both economic and psychological reasons, countries around the world have begun easing the restrictions which helped flatten the curve. Whether to see family or to head back to work, people are slowly coming out again. With trepidation and hesitation, towns and cities are starting to buzz once more, but this residual fear is understandable. Why?

As our knowledge of the virus grows, these characteristics of it serve as reminders of its potency:

  • 1. It spreads easily
  • 2. A carrier can be asymptomatic
  • 3. It has a long incubation period
  • 4. It survives longer in the air and on surfaces
How to stay safe from coronavirus


Stay COVID-free and COVID-safe campaigns have been blasting the airwaves for a while now, and they are necessary reminders. Below, we share steps you can take to stay safe from COVID-19. They may appear intrusive at the start, but over time, they will be good habits to adopt even post-coronavirus.


1. Keep your hands clean
Using warm water and soap to lather, give your palms, fingernails and in-between your fingers a good rub. Alternatively, the use of hand sanitisers can help too. Given we use our hands for a range of everyday tasks, it is sensible to clean them regularly.


2. Keep your hands off!
Research has shown we touch our faces more than 20 times an hour (3)! Although technically there isn’t anything wrong with this, we know it can increase the likelihood of viruses entering the body through our eyes, nose and mouth, so keeping your hands away from your face will help to reduce the risk of getting infected.


3. Keep your social hygiene game up
It’s always been bad social etiquette to sneeze and cough without covering your mouth and nose. Now, it is potentially life-threatening too. Sneeze or cough into your elbow and wash your hands immediately after. This is essential for preventing the spread of the virus.


4. Keep surfaces cleaned and disinfected
Coronavirus is invisible, so be sure to clean and disinfect surfaces you’re in constant contact with, for example, mobile phones, laptops, tables, doorknobs, kitchen worktops and furniture. If you’re back in the office, the cleaner will probably be staying on top of this for you, but at home, make it a habit and do it as often as you can.


5. Keep your distance
As mentioned, an infected person can be asymptomatic. Hence, keeping a safe distance from someone who doesn’t live in the same household as you as well as from others in a public space is a necessary measure. This includes isolating yourself if you are unwell too.

Need more advice on how to prevent the spread of coronavirus?

Keeping COVID-19 at bay requires new social norms and habits. Though difficult for some, these measures aren’t impossible. To learn more about how to prevent coronavirus in Australia, get in touch with us today. Research has shown we touch our faces more than 20 times an hour (3)! Although technically there isn’t anything wrong with this, we know it can increase the likelihood of viruses entering the body through our eyes, nose and mouth, so keeping your hands away from your face will help to reduce the risk of getting infected.


1. Keep your social hygiene game up
It’s always been bad social etiquette to sneeze and cough without covering your mouth and nose. Now, it is potentially life-threatening too. Sneeze or cough into your elbow and wash your hands immediately after. This is essential for preventing the spread of the virus.


2. Keep surfaces cleaned and disinfected
Coronavirus is invisible, so be sure to clean and disinfect surfaces you’re in constant contact with, for example, mobile phones, laptops, tables, doorknobs, kitchen worktops and furniture. If you’re back in the office, the cleaner will probably be staying on top of this for you, but at home, make it a habit and do it as often as you can.


3. Keep your distance
As mentioned, an infected person can be asymptomatic. Hence, keeping a safe distance from someone who doesn’t live in the same household as you as well as from others in a public space is a necessary measure. This includes isolating yourself if you are unwell too.

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